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Analysis of Chromosome Replication with Eggs of Xenopus Laevis

  • R. A. Laskey
  • S. E. Kearsey
  • M. Mechali
Part of the Genetic Engineering: Principles and Methods book series (GEPM, volume 7)

Abstract

Although eukaryotic transcription systems have advanced dramatically in the last decade, systems for studying the other main function of the cell nucleus, chromosome replication, have lagged far behind. Studies of chromosome replication in eukaryotes are still limited by a shortage of efficient experimental systems. Although some of the events involved in movement of the replication fork can be reproduced in vitro, there is still an urgent need for eukaryotic cell-free systems which initiate replication efficiently on purified duplex DNA templates.

Keywords

Xenopus Laevis Replication Fork Xenopus Embryo Replica Tion Chromatin Assembly 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Laskey
    • 1
  • S. E. Kearsey
    • 1
  • M. Mechali
    • 1
  1. 1.CRC Molecular Embryology Group, Department of ZoologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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