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Quantitative Neoplastic Transformation in C3H/10T1/2 Cells

  • John S. Bertram
  • John E. Martner
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series

Abstract

The development of mammalian cell culture systems in which neoplastic transformation can be induced by exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens provided a major stimulus to the study of carcinogenic mechanisms. Furthermore, the potential ability to quantitate the induction of neoplasia on a per cell basis has allowed the study of factors modulating carcinogenesis with a quantitative precision hitherto impossible in animal models. However, problems arise in quantitation of the induced response when the number of cells at risk is varied or when treated cells are replated at various densities. Since in most cases the original rationale behind these cell-number manipulations was to increase the number of cells at risk and thus increase the probability of detecting low level exposure to radiation and chemicals, these problems and the various hypotheses generated to explain it, will be the major focus of this paper.

Keywords

Cell Generation Colony Size Seeding Density NEOPLASTIC Transformation Transformation Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. Bertram
    • 1
  • John E. Martner
    • 1
  1. 1.Grace Cancer Drug CenterRoswell Park Memorial InstituteBuffaloUSA

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