Weakly Charged Exotic Particles

  • A. Zehnder
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (EMISS, volume 23)


Global symmetries and the resulting conservation laws are the foundations of our understanding of the physical world. But certain symmetries are locally broken. The nature of this symmetry breaking and its consequences are not well understood. Two main concepts are in discussion today: The dynamic and the spontaneous symmetry breaking. The present talk is limited to the latter: Its main experimental consequence is the prediction of new particles; they can be classified in two groups: the “massless” Goldstone bosons, which would lead to “longrange” interaction between particles, and the massive particles like the Higgs boson, which could be detected via their production or decay processes. The talk presents an overview, followed by a specific discussion of selected particles with predictions in the standard Weinberg-Salam model.


Higgs Boson Coupling Strength Decay Width Scalar Particle Exchange Potential 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Zehnder
    • 1
  1. 1.Swiss Institute for Nuclear ResearchVilligenSwitzerland

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