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Behavioral Group Therapy with Heterogeneous Clients

  • John V. Flowers
  • Bernard Schwartz
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Previous reviews of the status of behavioral group therapy (Flowers, 1979a; Upper & Ross, 1977) concentrated in part on the distinction between behavior therapy done in a group, such as massed desensitization (Paul, 1966) or massed assertion training (Booraem & Flowers, 1977) and behavior therapy done by a group, in which the group interaction is a crucial part of the therapeutic process (Flowers, 1979a). Subsequent work in the field of behavioral group therapy (Upper & Ross, 1979, 1980, 1981) has clearly demonstrated that there are in fact four types of behavioral group therapy in present use. These groups can be differentiated by two variables: (a) the variety of behavioral techniques employed (singular vs. multiple); and (b) the degree to which the members share similar problems (homogeneity vs. heterogeneity). Although heterogeneity in this context has been primarily defined in terms of the presenting problem, the term heterogeneity in this chapter also means variance in terms of such associated variables as sex, socioeconomic status, previous experience in therapy, and the like.

Keywords

Group Therapy Annual Review Homework Assignment Voluntary Disclosure Behavioral Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John V. Flowers
    • 1
  • Bernard Schwartz
    • 2
  1. 1.Chapman CollegeOrangeUSA
  2. 2.Santa Ana CollegeSanta AnaUSA

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