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Preparing Clients for Behavioral Group Therapy

  • Nancy B. Cohn
  • Neal H. Mayerson
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Group therapy is a process that is presumed to be facilitated by specific types of client behaviors. For example, Yalom (1975) described a number of “curative factors” in interactional group therapy, including processes such as (a) learning that others have similar kinds of problems and feelings (universality); (b) emotional catharsis; and (c) learning how one’s behavior affects people. Certain client behaviors, such as self-disclosure of problems and feedback to other group members, serve to promote these “curative factors.”

Keywords

Group Therapy Outcome Expectation Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Client Satisfaction Vicarious Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy B. Cohn
    • 1
  • Neal H. Mayerson
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Behavioral Medicine AssociatesSalt Lake CityUSA

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