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Behavioral Group Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

  • Paul M. G. Emmelkamp
  • Antoinette C. M. Kuipers
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

In this chapter, the group application of behavioral and cognitive procedures in the treatment of anxiety-based disorders will be discussed. Many studies have involved group therapy of mildly disturbed college students, but the emphasis here will be on application in clinical settings. The term patient is used throughout this chapter when clinical anxiety or fears are involved; otherwise the term subject is used.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Social Anxiety Irrational Belief Test Anxiety Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. G. Emmelkamp
    • 1
  • Antoinette C. M. Kuipers
    • 2
  1. 1.Academic HospitalGroningenNetherlands
  2. 2.Psychiatric Hospital “Lichten Kracht,”AssenNetherlands

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