Advertisement

Behavioral Group Treatment for Addictive-Appetitive Disorders

Alcoholism, Smoking, Obesity, and Drug Abuse
  • Billy A. Barrios
  • Rex W. Turner
  • Steven M. Ross
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Early critics of behavior therapy charged that support for the approach rested largely on studies of the innocuous, transient ailments of college students (e.g., Cooper, Furst, & Bridger, 1969). Naturally, behavior therapists did not take such a slur lying down. Attempts were made by some to logically refute the charge (Levis, 1970; Mahoney, Kazdin, & Lesswing, 1974; McGlynn, 1975) and by others to empirically prove the criticism false. This latter reaction has taken the form of expanding the range of problems and client groups that are amenable to behavioral techniques, among the most aggressively tackled of which have been the addictive and appetitive disorders of alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and drug abuse. As a result, we now have an enormous amount of information on behavior therapy’s ability to alter these historically prevalent and intractable patterns. And because the bulk of those treatment outcome studies employed a group format, we also have a wealth of data that is pertinent to the practice of behavioral group therapy per se.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Smoking Behavior Addictive Behavior Social Skill Training Behavioral Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abrahms, J. L. A cognitive-behavioral versus nondirective group treatment program for opioid-addicted persons: An adjunct to methadone maintenance. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1979, 14, 503–511.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Abrahms, J. L., & Allen, G. J. Comparative effectiveness of situational programming, financial payoffs and group pressure in weight reduction. Behavior Therapy, 1974, 5, 391–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Abrams, D. B., & Wilson, G. T. Self-monitoring and reactivity in the modification of cigarette smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1979, 47, 243–251.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Abramson, E. E. A review of behavioral approaches to weight control. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1973, 11, 547–556.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Adinolfi, A. A., McCourt, W. F., & Geoghegan, S. Group assertiveness training for alcoholics. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1976, 37, 311–320.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Ahles, T. A., Schlundt, D. G., Prue, D. M., & Rychtarik, R. G. Impact of aftercare arrangements on the maintenance of treatment success in abusive drinkers. Addictive Behaviors, 1983, 8, 53–58.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Albrecht, B. L. The alcoholism process: A social learning viewpoint. In P. Bourne & R. Fox (Eds.), Alcoholism: Progress in Research and Treatment. New York: Academic Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  8. Ashby, W. A., & Wilson, G. T. Behavior therapy for obesity: Booster sessions and long-term maintenance of weight loss. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1977, 15, 451–463.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Ayllon, T., & Azrin, N. H. The token economy: A motivational system for therapy and rehabilitation. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1968.Google Scholar
  10. Azrin, N. H. Improvements in the community reinforcement approach to alcoholism. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1976, 14, 339–348.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Balch, P., & Ross, A. W. A behaviorally oriented didactic-group treatment of obesity: An exploratory study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 1974, 5, 239–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Balch, P., & Ross, A. W. Predicting success in weight reduction as a function of locus of control: A unidimensional and multidimensional approach. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1975, 43, 119.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Beaver, C., Brown, R. A., & Lichtenstein, E. Effects of monitored nicotine fading and anxiety management training on smoking reduction. Addictive Behaviors, 1981, 6, 301–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Bellack, A. S. Behavioral treatment for obesity: Appraisal and recommendations. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 4). New York: Academic Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  15. Bellack, A. S., Rozensky, R., & Schwartz, J. A comparison of two forms of self-monitoring in a behavioral weight reduction program. Behavior Therapy, 1974, 5, 523–530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Beneke, W. M., Paulsen, B., McReynolds, W. T., Lutz, R. N., & Kohrs, M. B. Long-term results of two behavior modification weight loss programs using nutritionists as therapists. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 501–507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Berne, E. Transactional analysis in psychotherapy. New York: Grove Press, 1961.Google Scholar
  18. Bernstein, D. A. Modification of smoking behavior: An evaluative review. Psychological Bulletin, 1969, 71, 418–440.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Bernstein, D. A., & Borkovec, T. D. Progressive relaxation training: A manual for the helping professions. Champaign, Ill.: Research Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  20. Bernstein, D. A., & McAlister, A. The modification of smoking behavior: Progress and problems. Addictive Behaviors, 1976, 1, 89–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Best, J. A., & Steffy, R. A. Smoking modification procedures for internal and external locus of control clients. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 1975, 2, 155–165.Google Scholar
  22. Bloch, S., Crouch, E., & Reibstein, J. Therapeutic factors in group psychotherapy: A review. Archives of General Psychiatry, 1981, 38, 591–526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Bornstein, P. H., Carmody, T. P., Relinger, H., Zohn, C. J., Devine, D. A., & Bugge, I. D. Reduction of smoking behavior: A multivariable treatment package and the programming of response maintenance. Psychological Record, 1977, 27, 733–741.Google Scholar
  24. Bornstein, P. H., & Sipprelle, C. N. Group treatment of obesity by induced anxiety. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1973, 11, 339–341.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Bray, G. A. The obese patient. Philadelphia: Saunders, 1976.Google Scholar
  26. Brockway, B. S., Kleinmann, G., Edleson, J., & Gruenewald, K. Non-aversive procedures and their effect on cigarette smoking. Addictive Behaviors, 1977, 2, 121–128.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Brownell, K. D. Obesity: Understanding and treating a serious, prevalent and refractory disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1982, 50, 820–840.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Brownell, K. D., & Stunkard, A. J. Couples training, pharmacotherapy, and behavior therapy in the treatment of obesity. Archives of General Psychiatry, 1981, 38, 1224–1229.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Brownell, K. D., Heckerman, C. L., Westlake, R. J., Hayes, S. C., & Monti, P. M. The effect of couples training and partner co-operativeness in the behavioral treatment of obesity. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1978, 16, 323–333.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Brownell, K. D., Heckerman, C. L., & Westlake, R. J. The behavioral control of obesity: A descriptive analysis of a large-scale program. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 1979, 35, 864–869.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Cadogen, D. A. Marital group therapy in alcoholism treatment. In E. Kaufman & P. Kaufman (Eds.), Family therapy of drug and alcohol abuse. New York: Halsted Press, 1979.Google Scholar
  32. Cahalan, D. Implications of American drinking practices and attitudes for prevention and treatment of alcoholism. In G. A. Marlatt & P. E. Nathan (Eds.), Behavioral approaches to alcoholism. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies, 1978.Google Scholar
  33. Callner, D. A., & Ross, S. M. The assessment and training of assertive skills with drug addicts: A preliminary study. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1978, 13, 227–239.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Callner, D. A., & Ross, S. M. Behavioral treatment approaches to drug abuse. In J. M. Ferguson & C. B. Taylor (Eds.), The comprehensive handbook of behavioral medicine (Vol. 3). Jamaica, N.Y.: Spectrum, 1980.Google Scholar
  35. Carroll, L. J., & Yates, B. T. Further evidence for the role of stimulus control training in facilitating weight reduction after behavior therapy. Behavior Therapy, 1981, 12, 287–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Carroll, L. J., Yates, B. T., & Gray, J. J. Predicting obesity reduction in behavioral and nonbehavioral therapy from client characteristics: The self-evaluation measure. Behavior Therapy, 1980, 11, 189–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Carter, E. N., Rice, A. P., & Dejulio, S. Role of the therapist in the self-control of obesity. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1977, 45, 503.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Castro, L., & Rachlin, H. Self-reward, self-monitoring, and self-punishment as feedback in weight control. Behavior Therapy, 1980, 11, 38–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Cautela, J. R. Covert sensitization. Psychological Reports, 1967, 74, 459–468.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Chaney, E. F., O’Leary, M. R., & Marlatt, G. A. Skill training with alcoholics. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 1092–1104.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Cheek, F. Behavior modification for addicts on methadone maintenance. Current Psychiatric Therapies, 1978, 16, 223–232.Google Scholar
  42. Coates, T. J., Jeffery, R. W., Slinkard, L. A., Killen, J. D., & Danaher, B. G. Frequency of contact and monetary reward in weight loss, lipid change, and blood pressure reduction with adolescents. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 175–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Colletti, G., & Stern, L. Two-year follow-up of a nonaversive treatment for cigarette smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1980, 48, 292–293.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Colletti, G., & Supnick, J. A. Continued therapist contact as a maintenance strategy for smoking reduction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1980, 48, 665–667.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Cooper, A., Furst, J. B., & Bridger, W. H. A brief commentary on the usefulness of studying fears of snakes. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1969, 24, 413–414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Copemann, C. D. Drug addiction: II. An aversive counter-conditioning technique for treatment. Psychological Reports, 1976, 38, 1271–1281.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Copemann, C. D., & Shaw, P. L. A behaviorally-oriented treatment program for drug addiction: A preliminary report. American Journal of Public Health, 1976, 66, 286–287.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Cummings, C., Gordon, J. F., & Marlatt, G. A. Relapse: Prevention and prediction. In W. R. Miller (Ed.), The addictive behaviors. Oxford, England: Pergamon Press, 1980.Google Scholar
  49. Delahunt, J., & Curran, J. P. Effectiveness of negative practice and self-control techniques in the reduction of smoking behavior. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1976, 44, 1002–1007.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Dilley, D., Balch, P., & Balch, K. A comparison of strategies for behavioral obesity treatment. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 1979, 10, 193–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Donke, J. A., Lando, H. A., & Robinson, D. C. A behavioral weight control program for residence hall students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 1981, 28, 365–368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Duehn, W. D. Covert sensitization in group treatment of adolescent drug abusers. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1978, 13, 485–491.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Edinger, J. D., Nelson, W. M., Davidson, K. M., & Wallace, J. Modification of smoking behaviors in a correctional institution. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 1978, 34, 991–998.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Elliott, C. H., & Denney, D. R. Weight control through covert sensitization and false feedback. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1975, 43, 842–850.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Elliott, C. H., & Denney, D. R. A multiple-component treatment approach to smoking reduction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 1330–1339.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Elliott, R., & Tighe, T. Breaking the cigarette habit: Effects of a technique involving threatened loss of money. Psychological Record, 1968, 18, 503–513.Google Scholar
  57. Emrick, C. D., & Hansen, J. Assertions regarding effectiveness of treatment for alcoholism: Fact or fantasy? American Psychologist, 1983, 38, 1078–1088.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Epstein, L. H., & McCoy, J. F. Issues in smoking control. Addictive Behaviors, 1975, 1, 65–72.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Epstein, L. H., Masek, B. J., & Marshall, W. R. A nutritionally based school program for control of eating in obese children. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 766–778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Epstein, L. H., Wing, R. R., Koeske, R., Andrasik, F., & Ossip, D. J. Child and parent weight loss in family-based behavior modification programs. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1981, 49, 674–685.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Epstein, L. H., Wing, R. R., Koeske, R., Ossip, D., & Beck, S. A comparison of lifestyle change and programmed aerobic exercise on weight and fitness changes in obese children. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 651–665.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Ferrell, W. L., & Galassi, J. P. Assertion training and human relations training in the treatment of alcoholics. International Journal of the Addictions, 1981, 16, 959–968.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  63. Flaxman, J. Quitting smoking now or later: Gradual, abrupt, immediate, and delayed quitting. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 260–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Flowers, J. V. Behavioral analysis of group therapy and a model for behavioral group therapy. In D. Upper & S. M. Ross (Eds.), Behavioral group therapy, 1979: An annual review. Champaign, Ill.: Research Press, 1979.Google Scholar
  65. Foreyt, J. P., & Hagen, R. L. Covert sensitization: Conditioning or suggestion? Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1973, 82, 17–23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Foreyt, J. P., Mitchell, R. E., Garner, D. T., Gee, M., Scott, L. W., & Gotto, A. M. Behavioral treatment of obesity: Results and limitations. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 153–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Foxx, R. M., & Brown, R. A. Nicotine fading and self-monitoring for cigarette abstinence or controlled smoking. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1979, 12, 111–125.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Foxx, R. M., Brown, R. A., & Katz, I. Nicotine fading and self-monitoring for cigarette abstinence or controlled smoking: A two and one-half year follow-up. The Behavior Therapist, 1981, 4, 21–23.Google Scholar
  69. Frohwirth, R. A., & Foreyt, J. P. Aversive conditioning treatment of overweight. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 861–872.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Glasgow, R. E., Schafer, L., & O’Neill, H. K. Self-help books and amount of therapist contact in smoking cessation programs. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1981, 49, 659–667.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Goldman, M. S. Cognitive impairment in chronic alcoholics. American Psychologist, 1983, 38, 1045–1054.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Gormally, J., & Rardin, D. Weight loss and maintenance and changes in diet and exercise for behavioral counseling and nutrition education. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 1981, 28, 295–304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Gutmann, M., & Marston, A. R. Problems of S’s motivation in a behavioral program for reduction of cigarette smoking. Psychological Reports, 1967, 20, 1107–1114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Hackett, G., & Horan, J. J. Partial component analysis of a comprehensive smoking program. Addictive Behaviors, 1979, 4, 259–262.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Hall, S. M., Hall, R. G., Hanson, R. W., & Borden, D. L. Permanence of two self-managed treatments of overweight in university and community populations. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1974, 42, 731–786.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Hall, S. M., Hall, R. G., Borden, B. L., & Hanson, R. W. Follow-up strategies in the behavioral treatment of overweight. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1975, 13, 167–172.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Hall, S. M., Hall, R. G., DeBoer, G., & O’Kulitch, P. Self and external management compared with psychotherapy in the control of obesity. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1977, 15, 89–95.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Hanson, R. W., Borden, B. L., Hall, S. M., & Hall, R. G. Use of programmed instruction in teaching self-management skills to overweight adults. Behavior Therapy, 1976, 7, 366–373.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Harmatz, M. G., & Lapuc, P. Behavior modification of overeating in a psychiatric population. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1968, 32, 583–587.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Harris, M. B. Self-directed program for weight control. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1969, 74, 263–270.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Harris, M. B., & Bruner, C. G. A comparison of a self-control and a contract procedure for weight control. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1971, 9, 347–354.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Harris, M. B., & Hallbauer, E. S. Self-directed weight control through eating and exercise. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1973, 11, 523–529.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Hartigan, K. J., Baker-Strauch, D., & Morris, G. W. Perceptions of the causes of obesity and responsiveness to treatment. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 1982, 29, 478–485.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Heather, N., & Robertson, I. Controlled drinking. London: Metheun, 1981.Google Scholar
  85. Hunt, G. M., & Azrin, N. H. A community-reinforcement approach to alcoholism. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1973, 11, 91–104.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Hunt, W. A., & Bespalec, D. A. An evaluation of current methods of modifying smoking behavior. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 1974, 30, 431–438.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Hunt, W. A., & Matarazzo, J. D. Habit mechanisms in smoking. In W. A. Hunt (Ed.), Learning mechanisms in smoking. Chicago: Aldine, 1970.Google Scholar
  88. Intagliata, J. C. Increasing the interpersonal problem-solving skills of an alcoholic population. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 489–498.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Israel, A. C., & Saccone, A. J. Follow-up of effects of choice of mediator and target of reinforcement on weight loss. Behavior Therapy, 1979, 10, 260–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Israel, A. C., Raskin, P. A., & Pravder, M. D. The effects of self-monitoring of smoking and awareness of accuracy feedback upon a concurrent behavior. Addictive Behaviors, 1979, 4, 199–203.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. James, J. E., & Hampton, B. A. M. The relative efficacy of directive and nondirective treatment in behavioral weight control. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 463–475.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Janis, I. L., & Hoffman, D. Facilitating effects of daily contact between partners who make a decision to cut down on smoking. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1971, 17, 25–35.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Jeffery, D. B., & Christensen, E. R. Behavior therapy versus “will power” in the management of obesity. Journal of Psychology, 1975, 90, 303–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Jeffery, R. W., & Gerber, W. M. Group and correspondence treatments for weight reduction used in multiple risk factor intervention trial. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 24–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Jeffery, R. W., & Wing, R. R. Frequency of therapist contact in the treatment of obesity. Behavior Therapy, 1979, 10, 186–192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Jeffery, R. W. Danaher, B. G., Killen, J., Farquhar, J. W., & Kinnier R. Self-administered programs for health behavior change: Smoking cessation and weight reduction by mail. Addictive Behaviors, 1982, 7, 57–64.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Jones, M. The therapeutic community. New York: Basic Books, 1953.Google Scholar
  98. Kanas, N. Alcoholism and group psychotherapy. In E. M. Pattison & E. Kaufman (Eds.), Encyclopedic handbook of alcoholism. New York: Gardner Press, 1983.Google Scholar
  99. Kantorowitz, D. A., Walters, J., & Pezdek, K. Positive versus negative self-monitoring in the self-control of smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 1148–1150.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Kaplan, H. I., & Sadock, B. J. Groups and Drugs. New York: E. P. Dutton, 1972.Google Scholar
  101. Karoly, P., & Doyle, W. W. Effects of outcome expectancy and timing of self-monitoring on cigarette smoking. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 1975, 31, 351–355.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Katahn, M., Pleas, J., Thackrey, M., & Wallston, K. A. Relationship of eating and activity self-reports to follow-up weight maintenance in the massively obese. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 521–528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Katz, R. C., Heiman, M., & Gordon, S. Effects of two self-management approaches on cigarette smoking. Addictive Behaviors, 1977, 2, 113–119.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Kaufman, E., & Pattison, E. M. Differential methods of family therapy in the treatment of alcoholism. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1981, 42, 951–971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  105. Kelly, A. H., & Curran, J. P. Comparison of a self-control approach to the treatment of obesity. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1976, 44, 683.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Keutzer, C.S. Behavior modification of smoking: The experimental investigation of diverse techniques. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1968, 6, 137–157.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. Keutzer, C. S., Lichtenstein, E., & Mees, H. L. Modification of smoking behavior: A review. Psychological Bulletin, 1968, 70, 520–533.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Kingsley, R. G., & Shapiro, U. A comparison of three behavioral programs for the control of obesity in children. Behavior Therapy, 1977, 8, 30–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Kingsley, R. G., & Wilson, G. T. Behavior therapy for obesity: A comparative investigation of long-term efficacy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1977, 45, 288–298.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Korman, I. B. The effectiveness of contractual management in weight reduction groups. Dissertation Abstracts International, 1973, 33(9), 4512B.Google Scholar
  111. Lando, H. A. A comparison of excessive and rapid smoking in the modification of chronic smoking behavior. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1975, 43, 350–355.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Lando, H. A. Stimulus control, rapid smoking, and contractual management in the maintenance of nonsmoking. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 962–963.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Lando, H. A. Effects of preparation, experimenter contact, and a maintained reduction alternative on a broad-spectrum program for eliminating smoking. Addictive Behaviors, 1981, 6, 123–133.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Lando, H. A. A factorial analysis of preparation, aversion, and maintenance in the elimination of smoking. Addictive Behaviors, 1982, 7, 143–154.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Lando, H. A., & McCullough, J. A. Clinical application of a broad-spectrum behavioral approach to chronic smokers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 1583–1585.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Lando, H. A., & McGovern, P. G. Three-year data on a behavioral treatment for smoking: A follow-up note. Addictive Behaviors, 1982, 7, 177–181.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Lazarus, A. A. Multimodal behavior therapy. New York: Springer, 1976.Google Scholar
  118. Levenberg, S. B., & Wagner, M. K. Smoking cessation: Long-term irrelevance of mode of treatment. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 1976, 7, 93–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Levinson, B. L., Shapiro, D., Schwartz, G. E., & Tursky, B. Smoking elimination by gradual reduction. Behavior Therapy, 1971, 2, 477–487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Levis, D. J. The case for performing research on nonpatent populations with fears of small animals: A reply to Cooper, Furst, and Bridger. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1970, 76, 36–38.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Lichtenstein, E., & Danaher, B. G. Modification of smoking behavior: A critical analysis of theory, research, and practice. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 3). New York: Academic Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  122. Lowe, M. R., Green, L., Kurtz, S. M. S., Ashenberg, Z. S., & Fisher, Jr., E. B. Self-initiated, cue extinction, and covert sensitization procedures in smoking cessation. Journal of Behavior Medicine, 1980, 3, 357–372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. MacDonough, T. S. The relative effectiveness of a medical hospitalization program versus a feedback-behavior modification program in treating alcohol and drug abusers. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1976, 11, 269–282.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  124. MacDonough, T. S. Evaluation of the effectiveness of intensive confrontation in changing the behavior of alcohol and drug abusers. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1978, 13, 529–589.Google Scholar
  125. Mahoney, M. J. Self-reward and self-monitoring techniques for weight control. Behavior Therapy, 1974, 5, 48–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Mahoney, M. J., Kazdin, A. E., & Lesswing, N. J. Behavior modification: Delusion or difference? In C. M. Franks & G. T. Wilson (Eds.), Annual review of behavior therapy, theory, and practice (Vol. 2). New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1974.Google Scholar
  127. Manno, B., & Marston, A. R. Weight reduction as a function of negative covert reinforcement (sensitization) versus positive covert reinforcement. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1972, 10, 201–207.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  128. Marlatt, G. A. Alcohol use and problem drinking: A cognitive-behavioral analysis. In P. C. Kendall & S. D. Hollon (Eds.), Cognitive-behavioral interventions: Theory, research and procedures. New York: Academic Press, 1979.Google Scholar
  129. Marlatt, G. A. The controlled drinking controversy: A commentary. American Psychologist, 1983, 38, 1097–1110.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  130. Marlatt, G. A., & Gordon, J. R. Determinants of relapse: Implications for the maintenance of behavior change. In P. O. Davidson & S. M. Davidson (Eds.), Behavioral medicine: Changing health lifestyles. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1980.Google Scholar
  131. Marrone, R. L., Merksamer, M. A., & Salzberg, P. M. A short duration group treatment of smoking behavior by stimulus satiation. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1970, 8, 347–352.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  132. Marston, A. R., & McFall, R. M. Comparison of behavior modification approaches to smoking reduction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1971, 36, 153–162.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  133. McCourt, W., & Glantz, M. Cognitive-behavior therapy in groups for alcoholics; a preliminary report. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1980, 41, 338–346.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  134. McFall, R. M., & Hammen, C. L. Motivation, structure, and self-monitoring: Role of nonspecific factors in smoking reduction. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1971, 37, 80–86.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  135. McGlynn, F. D. Theory and research in systematic desensitization. New York: Guilford Press, Behavioral Sciences Tape Library, 1975.Google Scholar
  136. McGrath, M. J., & Hall, S. M. Self-management treatment of smoking behavior. Addictive Behaviors, 1976, 1, 287–292.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  137. Merbaum, M., Avimier, R., & Goldberg, J. The relationship between aversion, group training and vomiting in the reduction of smoking behavior. Addictive Behaviors, 1979, 4, 279–285.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  138. Miller, P. M. Behavior therapy in the treatment of alcoholism. In G. A. Marlatt & P. E. Nathan (Eds.), Behavioral approaches toalcoholism. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies, 1978.Google Scholar
  139. Miller, W. R., & Hester, R. K. Treating the problem drinker: Modern approaches. In W. R. Miller (Ed.), The addictive behaviors. Oxford, England: Pergamon Press, 1980.Google Scholar
  140. Miller, W. R., & Mastria, M. A. Alternatives to alcohol abuse. Champaign, Ill.: Research Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  141. Miller, W. R., & Taylor, C. A. Relative effectiveness of bibliotherapy, individual and group self-control training in the treatment of problem drinkers. Addictive Behaviors, 1980, 5, 13–24.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  142. Miller, W. R., Pechacek, T. F., & Hamburg, S. Group behavior therapy for problem drinkers. International Journal of Addictions, 1981, 16, 829–839.Google Scholar
  143. Miller, W. R., Taylor, C. A., & West, J. C. Focused versus broad-spectrum behavior therapy for problem drinkers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1980, 48, 590–601.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  144. Moos, R. H., & Finney, J. W. The expanding scope of alcoholism treatment evaluation. American Psychologist, 1983, 38, 1036–1044.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Mulford, H. A. The epidemiology of alcoholism and its implications. In E. M. Pattison & E. Kaufman (Eds.), Encyclopedic handbook of alcoholism. New York: Gardner Press, 1982.Google Scholar
  146. Murphy, J. K., Williamson, D. A., Buxton, A. E., Moody, S. C., Absher, N., & Warner, M. The long-term effects of spouse involvement upon weight loss and maintenance. Behavior Therapy, 1982, 13, 681–693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  147. Murray, D. C. Preferred versus nonpreferred treatment, and self-control training versus determination raising as treatments of obesity: A pilot study. Psychological Reports, 1976, 38, 191–198.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  148. Nathan, P. E., & Lansky, D. Common methodology problems in research on the addictions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1978, 46, 713–726.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  149. Nelson, R. O. Assessment and therapeutic functions of self-monitoring. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 5). New York: Academic Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  150. Norton, G. R., & Barske, B. The role of aversion in the rapid-smoking treatment procedure. Addictive Behaviors, 1977, 2, 21–25.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  151. Ober, D. C. Modification of smoking behavior. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1968, 32, 543–549.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  152. Oei, T. P. S., & Jackson, P. R. Long-term effects of group and individual social skills training with alcoholics. Addictive Behaviors, 1980, 5, 129–136.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  153. Oei, T. P. S., & Jackson, P. R. Social skills and cognitive behavioral approaches to the treatment of problem drinking. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1982, 43, 532–547.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  154. Olson, R. P., Ganley, R., Devine, V. T., & Dorsey, G. D. Long-term effects of behavioral versus insight-oriented therapy with inpatient alcoholics. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1981, 49, 866–877.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  155. O’Neil, P. M., Currey, H. S., Hirsch, A. A., Riddle, F. E., Taylor, C. I., Malcolm, R. J., & Sexauer, J. D. Effects of sex of subject and spouse involvement on weight loss in a behavioral treatment program: A retrospective investigation. Addictive Behaviors, 1979, 4, 167–177.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  156. Parloff, M. B., & Dies, R. R. Group psychotherapy outcome research, 1966–1975. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 1977, 27, 281–319.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  157. Paxton, R. The effects of a deposit contract as a component in a behavioural programme for stopping smoking. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1980, 18, 45–50.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  158. Pearce, J. W., LeBow, M. D., & Orchard, J. Role of spouse involvement in the behavioral treatment of overweight women. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1981, 49, 236–244.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  159. Penick, S. B., Filion, R., Fox, S., & Stunkard, A. J. Behavior modification in the treatment of obesity. Psychosomatic Medicine, 1971, 33, 49–55.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  160. Pezzot-Pearce, T. D., LeBow, M. D., & Pearce, J. W. Increasing cost-effectiveness in obesity treatment through use of self-help behavioral manuals and decreased therapist contact. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1982, 50, 448–449.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  161. Pyke, S., Agnew, N. M., & Kopperud, J. Modification of an overlearned response through a relearn-ing program: A pilot study on smoking. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1966, 4, 197–203.Google Scholar
  162. Polakow, R. L., & Doctor, R. M. A behavioral modification program for adult drug offenders. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 1974, 11, 63–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  163. Polich, J. M., Armor, D. J., & Braiker, H. B. The course of alcoholism: Four years after treatment. New York: Wiley, 1981.Google Scholar
  164. Poole, A. D., Sanson-Fisher, R. W., & German, G. A. The rapid-smoking technique: Therapeutic effectiveness. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1981, 19, 389–397.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  165. Raw, M., & Russell, M. A. H. Rapid smoking, cue exposure and support in the modification of smoking. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1980, 18, 363–372.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  166. Reeder, C. W., & Kunce, J. T. Modeling techniques, drug abstinence behavior and heroin addicts: A pilot study. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 1976, 23, 560–562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  167. Relinger, H., Bornstein, P. H., Bugge, I. D., Carmody, T. P., & Zohn, C. J. Utilization of adverse rapid smoking in groups: Efficacy of treatment and maintenance procedures. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1977, 45, 245–249.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  168. Rodriguez, L., & Sandler, J. The treatment of adult obesity through direct manipulation of specific eating behaviors. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 1981, 12, 159–162.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  169. Romanczyk, R. G. Self-monitoring in the treatment of obesity: Parameters of reactivity. Behavior Therapy, 1974, 5, 531–540.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  170. Romanczyk, R. G., Tracey, D. A., Wilson, G. T., & Thorpe, G. L. Behavioral techniques in the treatment of obesity: A comparative analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1973, 11, 629–641.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  171. Rose, S. D. Group therapy: A behavioral approach. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1977.Google Scholar
  172. Ross, S. M., & Callner, D. A. Behavioral treatment of drug addiction. In S. Baker & R. Craig (Eds.), Drug dependent patient: Treatment and research. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, 1982.Google Scholar
  173. Ross, S. M., Lantinga, L. J., Homer, A. L., & Malee, J. Behavioral treatment of addictions: I. A curriculum approach for skills training. Paper presented at the National Drug Abuse Conference, San Francisco, May 1977. (a)Google Scholar
  174. Ross, S. M., Lantinga, L. J., Homer, A. L., & Malee, J. Behavioral treatment of addictions. IL A progress report of the response of addicts and alcoholics at the Salt Lake City VA Hospital. Paper presented at the National Drug Abuse Conference, San Francisco, May 1977. (b)Google Scholar
  175. Saccone, A. J., & Israel, A. C. Effects of experimenter versus significant other-controlled reinforcement and choice of target behavior on weight loss. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 271–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  176. Shaw, B. F., & Hollon, S. D. Cognitive therapy in a group format with depressed outpatients. Unpublished manuscript, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, 1978.Google Scholar
  177. Shipley, R. H. Maintenance of smoking cessation: Effect of follow-up letters, smoking motivation, muscle tension, and health locus of control. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1981,49, 982–984.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  178. Sonne, J. L., & Janoff, D. The effect of treatment attributions on the maintenance of weight reduction: A replication and extension. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 1979, 3, 389–397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  179. Spitzer, R. L., Forman, J. B. W., & Nee, J. DSM-III field trials: 1. Initial inter-rater diagnostic reliability. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1979, 136, 815–817.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  180. Steffy, R. A., Meichenbaum, D., & Best, J. A. Aversive and cognitive factors in the modification of smoking behaviour. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1970, 8, 115–126.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  181. Steinfeld, G. J. The use of covert sensitization with institutionalized narcotic addicts. The International Journal of the Addictions, 1970, 5, 225–232.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  182. Steinfeld, G. J., Rautio, E. A., Rice, A. H., & Egan, M. J. Group covert sensitization with narcotic addicts (further comments). The International Journal of the Addictions, 1974, 9, 447–464.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  183. Steinglass, P. An experimental treatment program for alcoholic couples. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1979, 40, 159.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  184. Stuart, R. B. A three-dimensional program for the treatment of obesity. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1971, 9, 177–186.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  185. Stuart, R. B., & Davis, B. Slim chance in a fat world. Champaign, Ill.: Research Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  186. Stunkard, A. J., & Mahoney, M. J. Behavioral treatment of eating disorders in H. Leitenberg (Ed.), Handbook of behavior modification and behavior therapy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1976.Google Scholar
  187. Surgeon General’s Advisory Committee. Smoking and Health (Publ. No. 1103). United States Public Health Service: Washington, D.C., 1964.Google Scholar
  188. Turner, R. W., Wehl, C. K., Cannon, D. S., & Craig, K. A. Mood-control training for depression in alcoholics: A comparison of behavioral and cognitive therapies. Paper presented at the National Alcohol and Drug Coalition Conference, Washington, D.C., 1980.Google Scholar
  189. Turner, R. W., Wehl, C. K., & Moreno, J. K. Long-term outcome for depressed alcoholics in mood-control therapy. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Anaheim, California, August 1983.Google Scholar
  190. Tyler, V. O., & Straughan, J. H. Coverant control and breath holding as techniques for the treatment of obesity. Psychological Record, 1970, 20, 473–478.Google Scholar
  191. United States Public Health Service. Health consequences of smoking. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971.Google Scholar
  192. United States Public Health Service. Health consequences of smoking. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1973.Google Scholar
  193. United States Public Health Service. Health consequences of smoking. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1974.Google Scholar
  194. Upper, D., & Meredith, L. A timed-interval procedure for modifying cigarette-smoking behavior. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, September 1970.Google Scholar
  195. Upper, D., & Meredith, L. A timed-interval procedure for modifying ciagrette-smoking behavior. Unpublished manuscript, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Brockton, Mass., 1971.Google Scholar
  196. Van Itallie, T. B. Testimony before Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1977.Google Scholar
  197. Voogt, R. D., Riggs, R. C., & Kline, W. B. Frequency of counselor contact in a behavioral weight control program. Behavioral Counseling Quarterly, 1981, 1, 130–135.Google Scholar
  198. Wehl, C. K., Turner, R. W., Cannon, D. S., & Craig, K. A. Group vs. individual cognitive-behavioral therapy for depressed alcoholics. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C., August 1982.Google Scholar
  199. Weismann, M. M., & Myers, J. K. Clinical depression in alcoholism. American Journal of Psychiatry, 1980, 137, 372–373.Google Scholar
  200. Weisz, G., & Bucher, B. Involving husbands in treatment of obesity—effects on weight loss, depression, and marital satisfaction. Behavior Therapy, 1980, 11, 643–650.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  201. Whitman, T. L. Modification of chronic smoking behavior: A comparison of three approaches. Behaviour Research and Therapy 1969, 7, 257–263.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  202. Whitman, T. L. Aversive control of smoking behavior in a group context. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1972, 10, 97–104.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  203. Wilcoxon-Craighead, L., Stunkard, A. J., & O’Brien, M. Behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for obesity. Archives of General Psychiatry, 1981, 38, 763–768.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  204. Wilkinson, D. A., & Sanchez-Craig, M. Relevance of brain dysfunction to treatment objectives: Should alcohol-related cognitive deficits influence the way we think about treatment? Addictive Behaviors, 1981, 6, 253–260.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  205. Wilson, G. T., & Brownell, K. D. Behavior therapy for obesity: Including family members in the treatment process. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 943–945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  206. Wilson, G. T., & Brownell, K. D. Behavior therapy for obesity: An evaluation of treatment outcome. Advances in Behaviour Research and Therapy, 1980, 3, 49–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  207. Winett, R. A. Parameters of deposit contracts in the modification of smoking. Psychological Record, 1973, 23, 49–60.Google Scholar
  208. Wing, R. R., & Epstein, L. H. Prescribed level of caloric restriction in behavioral weight loss programs. Addictive Behaviors, 1981, 6, 139–144.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  209. Wing, R. R., Epstein, L. H., Marcus, M., & Shapira, B. Strong monetary contingencies for weight loss during treatment and maintenance. Behavioral Therapy, 1981, 12, 702–710.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  210. Wing, R. R., Epstein, L. H., & Shapira, B. The effect of increasing initial weight loss with the Scarsdale diet or subsequent weight loss in a behavioral program. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1982, 50, 446–447.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  211. Wisocki, P. A., & Rooney, E. J. A comparison of thought stopping and covert sensitization techniques in the treatment of smoking: A brief report. Psychological Record, 1974, 24, 191–192.Google Scholar
  212. Wollersheim, J. P. The effectiveness of group therapy based upon learning principles in the treatment of overweight women. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1970, 76, 462–474.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  213. Zitter, R. E., & Fremouw, W. J. Individual versus partner consequation for weight loss. Behavior Therapy, 1978, 9, 808–813.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Billy A. Barrios
    • 1
  • Rex W. Turner
    • 2
  • Steven M. Ross
    • 2
  1. 1.University of MississippiUniversityUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration Medical CenterSalt Lake CityUSA

Personalised recommendations