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A Behavioral Group Therapy Approach to the Treatment of Depression

  • Peter M. Lewinsohn
  • Julia Steinmetz Breckenridge
  • David O. Antonuccio
  • Linda Teri
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Depression is a significant clinical problem in the United States. The prevalence of clinical depression in this country has typically been estimated at 3 to 4% (Lehman, 1971; Levitt & Lubin, 1975), and the President’s Commission on Mental Health has estimated the lifetime incidence of depression at 20% (Task Panel Reports Submitted to the President’s Commission on Mental Health, Vol. IV, Appendix, 1978). More recent reports suggest that the point prevalence and lifetime rates are even higher (Amenson & Lewinsohn, 1981; Myers & Weiss-man, 1980). Depression is twice as likely to occur in women as in men (Amenson & Lewinsohn, 1981; Weissman & Klerman, 1977b), and it is a disorder that exacts a heavy toll in human suffering. It has debilitating effects across all areas of functioning (Weissman & Paykel, 1974), frequently during years of peak responsibility and productivity.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Irrational Belief Depressed Individual Unipolar Depression Depressed Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Lewinsohn
    • 1
  • Julia Steinmetz Breckenridge
    • 2
  • David O. Antonuccio
    • 3
  • Linda Teri
    • 4
  1. 1.University of OregonEugeneUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration Medical CenterPalo AltoUSA
  3. 3.Veterans Administration Medical CenterRenoUSA
  4. 4.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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