Behavior Modification in Groups

A Time-Limited Model for Assessment, Planning, Intervention, and Evaluation
  • Martin Sundel
  • Sandra Stone Sundel
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

The past decade has witnessed considerable growth in the research and application of behavior modification approaches to groups (Lawrence & Sundel, 1972, 1975; Lawrence & Walter, 1978; Rose, 1972, 1977, 1980; Sundel & Lawrence, 1970, 1974, 1977; Upper & Ross, 1979, 1980, 1981). Mental health professionals have become increasingly interested in the application of behavioral principles and techniques to group settings. The high cost of delivering individual services and the increased emphasis on brief therapies (Budman, 1981) have contributed to this favorable climate, especially for group treatment offered on a short-term or time-limited basis.

Keywords

Role Play Behavioral Group Dinner Table Behavioral Rehearsal Goal Progress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Sundel
    • 1
  • Sandra Stone Sundel
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Social WorkThe University of Texas at ArlingtonArlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Private practiceArlingtonUSA

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