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The Biotechnology Industry

Impact of Federal Research and Regulatory Policies
  • Joseph G. Perpich

Abstract

The biological revolution underscores the success of the federal government’s commitment to the support of basic research: the billions for health research through the National Institute of Health (NIH) in the 1950s and 1960s directly led to the discovery of recombinant DNA technology. As Dr. Donald Fredrickson, the former NIH director, has noted, there is a flood of basic discoveries in biochemistry, physiology, and medicine fueling today’s revolution in biology. In a recent address, Dr. James Wyngaarden, the current NIH director, observed that the traditional biomedical research disciplines are becoming increasingly unified scientifically, in Dr. Arthur Kornberg’s words, “by the common language of chemistry.” For purposes of definition for this chapter, the focus is on biotechnology, a broad term that weds the fermentation industry and the new fermentation technologies with the genetic engineering industry, principally recombinant DNA technology and cell fusion, better known as hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies.

Keywords

Venture Capital Biotechnology Company Biotechnology Industry Small Business Innovation Research Export Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Notes

  1. 1.
    See generally Perpich, J. G., Guest Editor, Biotechnology-The Impact on Societal Institutions, in Technology in Society 4(4) (1982), 5(1)Google Scholar
  2. 1a).
    . See generally Perpich, J. G., Guest Editor, Biotechnology-The Impact on Societal Institutions, in Technology in Society 5(3) (1983).Google Scholar
  3. 1b).
    . See generally Perpich, J. G., Guest Editor, Biotechnology-The Impact on Societal Institutions, in Technology in Society 6(1) (1984).Google Scholar
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    Krause, R., Is the biological revolution a match for the trinity of despair, Technology in Society 4(4): 267– 282 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Commercial biotechnology: An international analysis, U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, DC (Jan. 1984).Google Scholar
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    See generally Perpich, J. G., Genetic engineering and related biotechnologies: Scientific progress and public policy, Technology in Society 5(1):27–49 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Perpich, J. G., Industrial involvement in the development of NIH recombinant DNA research guidelines and related federal policies, Recombinant DNA Technical Bulletin 5:59–79 (June 1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Capron, A. M., Human genetic engineering, Technology in Society 6(l):23–37 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Alexander, M, Spread of organisms with novel genotypes, AAAS Advisory Committee, seminar series on bioengineering (sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency), May 17, 1983, Washington, D.C. (in press).Google Scholar
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    Donalds, J. E., Applications of Biotechnology in the Chemical Industry, AAAS Advisory Committee, seminar series on bioengineering (sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency), February 9, 1983, Washington, D.C. (in press).Google Scholar
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    Schmitt, H., Biotechnology and the lawmakers, Technology in Society 5(1):5–14 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Thomas, L. S., Oswald Avery and the cascade of surprises, Technology in Society 6(1):37–41 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Aubrey Milunsky and George J. Annas 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph G. Perpich
    • 1
  1. 1.Planning and Development, Meloy LaboratoriesRevlon Health CareSpringfieldUSA

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