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Inhibitors of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Inhibit Tumor-Promoter-Stimulated Chemiluminescence in Murine Keratinocytes

  • Susan M. Fischer
  • Laurel M. Adams
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

The carcinogenic process can be experimentally divided into stages; this is advantageous in developing an understanding of the molecular changes in each stage that are essential for the development of neoplasias. One of the best-studied multistage models is the mouse skin (Slaga et al., 1980a,b,c). Initiation is the result of a single application of a carcinogen, most commonly 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, at a dose that causes no tumors. The second stage, promotion, results from the repetitive treatment with a tumor promoter such as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Of all the biochemical and morphological responses of the epidermis to TPA, the most important and relevant appear to be the induction of ornithine decarboxylase, the induction of dark cells, hyperplasia, and the development of an inflammatory state (Slaga et al., 1980b, c, d).

Keywords

Benzoyl Peroxide Tumor Promotion Mouse Skin Ornithine Decarboxylase Arachidonic Acid Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan M. Fischer
    • 1
  • Laurel M. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Research DivisionThe University of Texas System Cancer Center, Science ParkSmithvilleUSA

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