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Occurrence of Leukotrienes in Rat Brain

Evidence for a Neuroendocrine Role of Leukotriene C4
  • Jan Åke Lindgren
  • Anna-Lena Hulting
  • Tomas Hökfelt
  • Sven-Erik Dahlén
  • Peter Eneroth
  • Sigbritt Werner
  • Carlo Patrono
  • Bengt Samuelsson
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

Leukotrienes (LT) are bioactive compounds with proposed roles as mediators of inflammation and allergy (Samuelsson, 1983). Production of LT is initiated by 5-lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid to 5(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), which is further transformed to an unstable epoxide (LTA4) (Borgeat et al., 1976; Borgeat and Samuelsson, 1979a). This intermediate can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to LTB4 (Borgeat and Samuelsson, 1979b; Corey et al., 1981). Alter-natively, LTA4 is converted, by addition of glutathione at C-6, into LTC4 (Murphy et al., 1979; Morris et al., 1980). Stepwise enzymatic elimination of glutamic acid and glycine in the peptide side chain leads to formation of LTD4 and LTE4, respectively (Örning and Hammarström, 1980; Bernström and Hammarström, 1980). The proposed mediator of allergic reactions, slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (Orange and Austen, 1969), has been identified as an entity composed of LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 (Samuelsson, 1983).

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Median Eminence Luteinizing Hormone Level Glutathione Disulfide Luteinizing Hormone Release 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Åke Lindgren
    • 1
  • Anna-Lena Hulting
    • 2
  • Tomas Hökfelt
    • 3
  • Sven-Erik Dahlén
    • 4
  • Peter Eneroth
    • 5
  • Sigbritt Werner
    • 2
  • Carlo Patrono
    • 6
  • Bengt Samuelsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiological ChemistryKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of EndocrinologyKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of HistologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Department of PhysiologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  5. 5.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  6. 6.Department of PharmacologyCatholic UniversityRomeItaly

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