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Parents’ and Students’ Attitude Changes Related to School Desegregation in New Castle County, Delaware

  • Margaret A. Parsons

Abstract

Although many researchers have investigated the relation between school desegregation and academic achievement for minority and majority students, few have explored the relation between school desegregation and attitudinal variables. This latter category of outcomes is of critical importance for intrinsic reasons and for effects relative to academic achievement. Among questions that need to be examined are the following:

What attitudes do parents have regarding school desegregation prior to implementation? What attitudes do students have regarding school desegregation prior to implementation? In what ways, if any, do these attitudes change following implementation of desegregation? When do the changes, if any, occur (i.e., immediately following implementation, or after one or more years)?

Keywords

School District Black Student White Student Racial Attitude School Desegregation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret A. Parsons
    • 1
  1. 1.Greater Flint Health Maintenance OrganizationFlintUSA

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