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Desegregation

  • Robert L. Green

Abstract

In September 1978, buses rolled throughout metropolitan Wilmington, Delaware. In so doing, they rolled past the major legal boundary blocking efforts to desegregate the nation’s schools: city limits. The buses carried children from virtually all-black neighborhoods in the central city to formerly all-white classrooms in the suburbs. They also brought suburban white children to schools in the black community. The exchange of students marked the first time that a court had compelled school children to cross former school district boundaries for the purpose of desegregation.

Keywords

Central City School District Residential Segregation White Child Black Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.University of the District of ColumbiaWashingtonUSA

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