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Research Methods from Applied Behavior Analysis

  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
  • F. Charles Mace
  • Stacy E. Mott
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Applied behavior analysis represents one of the major areas of research and practice in contemporary behavior modification or behavior therapy.1 This area developed from work on the experimental analysis of behavior (cf. Day, 1976; Ferster & Skinner, 1957; Sidman, 1960; Skinner, 1945, 1953, 1957, 1969, 1974) and emphasizes the analysis of the effects of independent events (or variables) on the occurrence of specific behaviors (or responses). Research and practice in the field focus on behaviors that are clinically or socially relevant (e.g., academic skills and social behaviors) and adheres to certain methodological criteria (e.g., experimental analysis, observer agreement on response measures, social validation of therapeutic effects).

Keywords

Behavior Analysis Behavioral Assessment Apply Behavior Analysis Systematic Replication Psychoactive Medication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
    • 1
  • F. Charles Mace
    • 2
  • Stacy E. Mott
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  2. 2.School of Psychology ProgramLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  3. 3.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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