Methodological and Statistical Techniques for the Chronometric Study of Mental Abilities

  • Arthur R. Jensen
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The study of individual differences in reaction time (RT) had its origin not in psychology, but in astronomy. The Prussian astronomer F. W. Bessel, in 1823, coined the term personal equation for the consistent differences among telescopic observers in recording the exact moment that the transit of a star crosses a hairline in the visual field of the telescope. The need to make corrections for the personal equation led to the invention, in 1828, of the chronograph, an instrument for the precise measurement of RT, which was later to become useful to psychologists.

Keywords

Fatigue Manifold Attenuation Covariance Shrinkage 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur R. Jensen
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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