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The Defense of a Psychiatrist Charged with Malpractice

  • Alan J. Tuckman
Part of the Critical Issues in American Psychiatry and the Law book series (CIAP, volume 2)

Abstract

To function as a forensic psychiatrist, evaluating individuals engaged in legal matters, and then testifying in their behalf, is an arduous but challenging task. Many learned treatises and conferences have been devoted to the basics, the ethics, and the nuances of this difficult and complex specialty. Yet, after a number of years, as with any task performed repeatedly, one becomes comfortable and proficient in it. Although there exists the constant challenge of the new case and the planned-for appearance in the courtroom, the “expert” in forensic psychiatry is trained to pursue his/her task along time-honored pathways.

Keywords

Child Psychiatry Expert Testimony Acad Psychiatry Forensic Psychiatry Malpractice Suit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan J. Tuckman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, School of MedicineNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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