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Horizontal Decalages and Individual Differences in the Development of Concrete Operations

  • Anik de Ribaupierre
  • Laurence Rieben
  • Jacques Lautrey

Abstract

Piagetian theory presents cognitive development as a progressive construction of new structures—structures d’ensemble—each of which integrates the preceding one while going beyond it. Structures d’ensemble are not content-tied but proceed from general reorganizations that result in a certain synchronism of acquisitions at a given moment of development. The existence of such structures, and of their properties of differentiation and integration, confers a unidimensional trend to development: steps or stages are reached in the same invariant order by all subjects; only the rate at which they are reached can vary. This unidimensional model can be regarded as verified only if the construction of notions acquired during the course of development both is synchronous at each step and follows the same invariant order between the steps. However, the existence of synchronism raises problems.

Keywords

Operative Aspect Weighted Frequency Unidimensional Model Figurative Intelligence Theoretical Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anik de Ribaupierre
    • 1
  • Laurence Rieben
    • 1
  • Jacques Lautrey
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Psychology and the Educational SciencesUniversity of GenevaGeneva 4Switzerland
  2. 2.Laboratory of Differential PsychologyUniversity of Paris VParisFrance

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