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A Guarded Hot Plate Apparatus for Effective Thermal Conductivity of Insulations at 80–360 K

  • David R. Smith
  • Lambert J. Van Poolen

Abstract

This report describes modifications made to a guarded hot plate apparatus located at NBS/Boulder and used to measure materials having very low thermal conductivity, such as glass-fiber insulations. Measurements can be performed at temperatures from 80 K to 360 K, and from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum of 10−4 Pa. Various fill gasses (air, nitrogen, argon or helium) can be used. Overall uncertainties in thermal conductivity at atmospheric pressure are estimated to be 1% at the higher temperatures and 5% at the lower temperatures.

Keywords

Effective Thermal Conductivity Heater Plate Cold Plate Heat Leak Main Heater 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1]
    “Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded Hot Plate”, C177-76, 1981 Annual Book of ASTM Standards Part 18, Thermal Insulation, etc. pp. 20.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    “A Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus for Measuring Effective Thermal Conductivity of Insulations between 80 K and 360 K”, NBS1R 81–1657, National Bureau of Standards, U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Boulder, CO. (1982).Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Smith, D. R., and Hust, J. G., “Measurement of Effective Thermal Conductivity of a Glass Fiberboard Standard Reference Material”, Cryogenics 21 /7, 408–410 (July 1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Smith, D. R., Hust, J. G., and Van Poolen, L. J. “Measurement of Effective Thermal Conductivity of a Glass Fiber Blanket Standard Reference Material”, Cryogenics 21 /8, 460–462 (Aug. 1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Van Poolen, L. J., Hust, J. G., and Smith, D. R., “A Model of Apparent Thermal Conductivity for Glass-Fiber Insulations”, Thermal Conductivity 17, J. G. Hust, ed., ( Plenum, NY 1983 ), pp. 777–788.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Purdue Research Foundation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Smith
    • 1
  • Lambert J. Van Poolen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsSouth Dakota School of Mines and TechnologyRapid CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of EngineeringCalvin CollegeGrand RapidsUSA

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