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Engineering Anthropometry

  • Karl H. E. Kroemer
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 25)

Abstract

This paper attempts to summarize and abstract the current status of engineering anthropometry. It indicates sources of anthropometric data needed by the engineer. It discusses the practical application of anthropometric information to the modelling and design of manned systems for optimal fit to the human, for highest safety, and best performance.

Keywords

Anthropometric Data Body Dimension Interface Point Anthropometric Information Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl H. E. Kroemer
    • 1
  1. 1.Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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