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Changes in Tumor Tissue Oxygenation during Microwave Hyperthermia: Clinical Relevance

  • Haim I. Bicher
  • Nodar P. Mitagvaria
  • Duane F. Bruley
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)

Abstract

As previously described (Bicher 1981) TpO2 and blood flow increase in tumor as temperature increases until 41°C and decrease thereafter (microcirculation “breaking point”). In the present clinical study using O2 microelectrodes this response was reproduced in over 54 treatment sessions. However, it was found that as treatment progresses (patients are treated for one hour 10 times, twice weekly, and concomitantly receive 4000 rads of ionizing radiation) the initial increase of blood flow and TpO2 is reduced and there is immediate decrease in tissue oxygenation. A correlation between microvascular tumor physiological changes and tumor treatment responses is being developed.

Keywords

Blood Flow Increase Breaking Point Hyperthermia Treatment Present Clinical Study Oxygen Microelectrode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haim I. Bicher
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nodar P. Mitagvaria
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Duane F. Bruley
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Valley Cancer InstituteVan NuysUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Physiology Georgian Academy of SciencesTbilisiUSSR
  3. 3.Louisiana Tech UniversityRustonUSA

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