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Perfluorinated Organic Liquids and Emulsions as Biocompatible NMR Imaging Agents for 19F and Dissolved Oxygen

  • Leland C. ClarkJr.
  • Jerome L. Ackerman
  • Stephen R. Thomas
  • Ronald W. Millard
  • Richard E. Hoffman
  • Ronald G. Pratt
  • Holly Ragle-Cole
  • Robert A. Kinsey
  • Ramamurthi Janakiraman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)

Abstract

Emulsions of fluorocarbons are finding considerable use in biology for intravascular oxygen transport. Their wide clinical application seems inminent (1). Because of their high content of the natural isotope of fluorine (19F), such emulsions will prove valuable in imaging the vascular and reticuloendothelial system by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). New, in addition, we have found that the paramagnetic effect of dissolved oxygen decreases the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of 19F in fluorocarbons and other highly fluorinated compounds, such as anesthetic agents, such that the imaging of oxygen in solution is possible.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrum Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Amine Oxide Blood Substitute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leland C. ClarkJr.
    • 1
  • Jerome L. Ackerman
    • 2
  • Stephen R. Thomas
    • 3
  • Ronald W. Millard
    • 4
  • Richard E. Hoffman
    • 1
  • Ronald G. Pratt
    • 2
  • Holly Ragle-Cole
    • 2
  • Robert A. Kinsey
    • 2
  • Ramamurthi Janakiraman
    • 3
  1. 1.Children’s Hospital Research FoundationCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Children’s Hospital Research FoundationUniversity of Cincinnati Department of ChemistryCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Children’s Hospital Research FoundationUniversity of Cincinnati College of Medicine Department of RadiologyCincinnatiUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pharmacology and Cell BiophysicsChildren’s Hospital Research FoundationCincinnatiUSA

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