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Response of Spinal Cord Oxygen Tension to Aortic Occlusion

  • F. Wadouh
  • H. Metzger
  • C. F. Arndt
  • M. Hartmann
  • M. Schywalsky
  • R. Hetzer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)

Abstract

Total occlusion of the descending aorta is followed by damage to the spinal cord but the exact cause and extent of the latter are not yet known. The most important immediate physiological responses to aortic occlusion -the change in pressure distribution within the circulation, the redistribution of the blood supply and the subsequent changes in oxygen transport — were examined in this study. According to Miyamoto (196o) and Blaisdell and Cooley (1962) an increase in the cerebro-spinal fluid pressure (CSFP) during occlusion causes compression of the spinal vessels and thus results in ischemic damage to the spinal cord. De Bakey (1959) on the other hand suggested that the spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is due to a fall in blood pressure within the aorta distal to the site of occlusion. Wadouh et al. (in preparation) have shown in animal experiments that changes in the CSFP during aortic occlusion do not cause SCI. Alone the ligature of the arteria radicularis magna anterior (ARMA) gave rise to the same rate of injury as a 45 minute occlusion of the aorta.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Spinal Cord Injury Left Subclavian Artery Spinal Cord Ischemia Local Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Wadouh
    • 1
  • H. Metzger
    • 1
  • C. F. Arndt
    • 1
  • M. Hartmann
    • 1
  • M. Schywalsky
    • 1
  • R. Hetzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Div. Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and Dept. of PhysiologyMedizinische Hochschule HannoverHannover 61Germany

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