Effects of Glucose and Thiol Depletion on Chemically-Induced Peroxide Production in Mammalian Cells

  • Marie E. Varnes
  • John E. Biaglow
  • Laurie Donahue
  • Stephen W. Tuttle
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)


Today there is a good deal of interest in oxygen and its role in carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and radiation response. Our laboratory has long been interested in one class of clinically useful drugs, the nitroaromatic heterocycles, which stimulate oxygen consumption in mammalian cells via metabolic reduction to oxygen-reactive radical anions (1,2). Figure 1 is a metabolic scheme for cellular reduction of the nitro compounds. This metabolism, and factors that influence it, has recently been reviewed by Biaglow (2) and by Mason (3).


Lipoic Acid Nitro Compound Pyridine Nucleotide Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell Electrode Chamber 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie E. Varnes
    • 1
  • John E. Biaglow
    • 1
  • Laurie Donahue
    • 1
  • Stephen W. Tuttle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation BiologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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