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Distribution of Blood Flow in Partially Closed Cerebral Capillary Networks

  • Antal G. Hudetz
  • Karl A. Conger
  • G. Arisztid
  • B. Kovach
  • James H. HalseyJr.
  • Keiichi Hino
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 180)

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine the direct effect of capillary closure on regional blood flow. Microcirculatory obstruction is a major factor influencing the evolution of cerebral infarction. It has been suggested that tissue swelling compresses primarily the microcirculation (Little et al., 1976), most likely at the site of the lowest blood pressure. Therefore, we have constructed a microcirculatory model which relates blood flow to the number of closed versus open capillaries. It was anticipated that the topological pattern of the microcirculatory vasculature network has an important role in determining the relationship between blood flow and the number of perfused microvessels which are reduced significantly in cerebral ischemia. Computer simulation as well as experimental techniques have been developed and applied to answer these questions.

Keywords

Capillary Density Regional Blood Flow Significant Linear Correlation Tissue Blood Flow Perfuse Capillary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antal G. Hudetz
    • 1
  • Karl A. Conger
    • 1
  • G. Arisztid
    • 1
  • B. Kovach
    • 1
  • James H. HalseyJr.
  • Keiichi Hino
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Experimental Research DepartmentSemmelweis Medical UniversityBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Departments of Neurology and PathologyThe University of Alabama in BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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