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Sister Chromatid Exchanges in Workers Exposed to Low Doses of Styrene

  • Lamberto Camurri
  • Susanna Codeluppi
  • Laura Scarduelli
  • Silvia Candela

Abstract

Several studies have been published on structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in the peripheral lymphocytes of workers in the reinforced plastic industry (1–9). A number of these studies have shown an association between styrene exposure and increased frequen cies of CAs (1–4). Among the studies available on sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction in the lymphocytes of styrene-exposed workers, only two studies report a slight increase in SCEs (1,2). The present study completes the work published by Camurri et al. (2) and attempts to describe the increase in SCEs at different styrene environmental exposures.

Keywords

Chromosomal Aberration Sister Chromatid Exchange Peripheral Lymphocyte Unsaturated Polyester Mandelic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lamberto Camurri
    • 1
  • Susanna Codeluppi
    • 1
  • Laura Scarduelli
    • 1
  • Silvia Candela
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of GeneticsUSL 9Reggio Emilia, IItaly

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