Advertisement

Sister Chromatid Exchange in Phytohemagglutinin-Stimulated Lymphocytes of Nonfamilial Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Patients

  • A. Ghidoni
  • E. Privitera
  • E. Raimondi
  • D. Rovini
  • M. T. Illeni
  • N. Cascinelli

Abstract

The relationship between sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and DNA damage or carcinogenesis has been the subject of numerous investigations (1–6). Altered frequencies of SCEs have been reported in cancer patients (7–13), but their meaning with regard to cancer development has not yet been elucidated.

Keywords

Melanoma Patient Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Sister Chromatid Exchange Unrelated Subject Altered Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Latt, S.A. (1974) Sister chromatid exchanges, indices of human chromosome damage and repair: Detection of fluorescence and induction by mitomycin C. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 71:3162–3166.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Perry, P., and H.J. Evans (1975) Cytological detection of mutagen-carcinogen exposure by sister chromatid exchange. Nature(Lond.) 258:121–124.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Stetka, D.G., and S. Wolff (1976) Sister chromatid exchange as an assay for genetic damage induced by mutagen-carcinogens. Mutat. Res. 41:333–342.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Carrano, A.V., L.H. Thompson, P.A. Lindl, and J.L. Minkler (1978) Sister chromatid exchange as an indicator of mutagene sis. Nature (Lond.) 271:551–553.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kinsella, A.R., and M. Radman (1978) Tumor promoter induces sister chromatid exchanges: Relevance to mechanisms of carcinogens. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 75:6149–6153.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bradley, M.O., I.C. Hsu, and C.C. Harris (1979) Relationship between sister chromatid exchange and mutagenicity, toxicity and DNA damage. Nature (Lond.) 282:318–320.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kakati, S., S. Abe, and A.A. Sandberg (1978) Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in Philadelphia-positive leukemia. Cancer Res38:2918–2921.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Heerema, N.A., C.P. Palmer, and R.L. Baehner (1982) Elevated sister chromatid exchange and cell cycle analysis in bone marrow in childhood ALL. Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 6:323–330.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Chen, T.R. (1981) Frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges in heteroploid cell lines of human melanoma origin. J. Natl. Can cer nst. 66:273–277.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cervenka, J. (1981) Chromosomal changes associated with neoplasia. In Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation, R.G. McKinnell et al., eds. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Vol. 11, pp. 93–101.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lambert, B., U. Ringborg, and A. Lindblad (1979) Prolonged increase of sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes of melanoma patients after CCNU treatment. Mutat. Res. 59:295–300.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Turleau, C., M.O. Cabanis, and J. de Grouchy (1980) Augmentation des échanges de chromatides dans les fibroblastes d’un enfant atteint de del(13)-rétinoblastome. Ann. Génét. 23:169–170.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ghidoni, A., E. Privitera, E. Raimondi, D. Rovini, M.T. Illeni, and N. Cascinelli (1983) Malignant melanoma: Sister chromatid exchange analysis in three families. Cancer Genet. Cytogenet9:347–354.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Ghidoni
    • 1
  • E. Privitera
    • 1
  • E. Raimondi
    • 1
  • D. Rovini
    • 2
  • M. T. Illeni
    • 2
  • N. Cascinelli
    • 2
  1. 1.Sezione di Genetica e Microbiologia Dipartimento di BiologiaUniversità di MilanoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei TumoriMilanItaly

Personalised recommendations