Advertisement

Serum- and Plasma-Dependent Variations of Benzo(a)Pyrene-Induced Sister Chromatid Exchange in Human Lymphocytes

  • J. K. Wiencke
  • K. Kelsey
  • R. Kreiger
  • V. F. Garry

Abstract

Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) is frequently used to assess the potential mutagenicity of chemical agents to human beings. We demonstrate here that levels of SCE induced by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) in the widely used blood lymphocyte assay are influenced by serum and plasma supplements. Sister chromatid exchange induction by BP was greatest when using fetal calf serum (FCS), intermediate with newborn calf serum (NCS), and lowest with autologous human plasma (AHP). This new finding adds to a growing list of factors capable of modulating the SCE response and underscores the need for re searchers to consider serum and plasma supplements in the standardization of the SCE approach in human mutagen assessments. The data also demonstrate the potential of SCE to aid in the study of serum factors which modify the mutagen sensitivity of human cells towards environmental carcinogens.

Keywords

Fetal Calf Serum Human Lymphocyte Sister Chromatid Exchange Newborn Calf Serum Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Carrano, A.V., and L.H. Thompson (1982) Sister chromatid exchange and single gene mutation. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, S. Wolff, ed. John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 59–86.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Abe, S., and M. Sasaki (1982) SCE as an index of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, A.A. Sandberg, ed. Alan R. Liss, New York, pp. 461–514.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Morgan, W.F., and P.E. Crossen (1981) Factors influencing sister chromatid exchange in cultured human lymphocytes. Mutat. Res. 81:395–402.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Carrano, A.V., and D.H. Moore (1982) The rationale and methodology for quantifying sister chromatid exchange in humans. In Mutagenicity: New Horizons in Genetic Toxicology, John Heddle, ed. Academic Press, New York, pp. 267–304.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lindblad, A., K. Holmberg, and D. Francesconi (1982) The use of sister chromatid exchange to monitor human populations exposed to toxicologically harmful agents. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, S. Wolff, ed. John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 149–182.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Schneider, E.L., and B. Gilman (1979) Sister chromatid exchange and aging. III. The effect of donor age on mutagen-induced sister chromatid exchange in human diploid fibroblasts. Human Genet. 46:57–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hill, A., and S. Wolff (1982) Increased induction of sister chromatid exchange by diethylstilbesterol in lymphocytes from pregnant and premenopausal women. Cancer Res. 42:893–896.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Morgan, W.F., and J.E. Cleaver (1982) 3-aminobenzamide syner-gistically increases sister chromatid exchanges in cells exposed to methyl methane sulfonate but not ultraviolet light. Mutat. Res. 104:361–366.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Rudiger, H.W., W. Harder, P. Maack, F.V. Kohl, and U.J. Schmidt-Preuss (1980) Decreased rate of benzo(a)pyrene-induced sister chromatid exchange in fibroblast cultures from patients with lung cancer. Cancer Clin. Oncol. 102:169–175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Norppa, H., H. Vainio, and M. Sorsa (1983) Metabolic activation of styrene by erythrocytes detected as increased sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes. Cancer Res. 43:3579–3582.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Evans, H.J. (1982) Sister chromatid exchanges and disease states in man. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, S. Wolff, ed. John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 183–228.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Samson, L., and J.L. Schwartz (1980) Evidence for an adaptive DNA repair pathway in CHO and human skin fibroblast cell lines. Nature (Lond.) 287:861–863.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Holmberg, B., and U. Ahlborg (1983) Consensus Report: Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of car exhausts and coal combustion emissions. Environ. Hlth. Perspec. 47:1–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Wiencke, J.K., J. Cervenka, and H. Paulus (1979) Mutagenic activity of anticancer agent cis-dichlorodiamine platinum II. Mutat. Res. 68:69–74.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Crossen, P.E. (1982) SCE in lymphocytes. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, A.A. Sandberg, ed. Alan R. Liss, New York, pp. 175–193.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kato, H., and A.A. Sandberg (1977) The effect of sera on sister chromatid exchange in vitro. Exp. Cell Res. 109-445–448.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Ghosh, P., and R. Nand (1979) Reduced frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in human lymphocytes cultured with autologous serum. Human Genet. 51:167–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Shu, H., and A.V. Nichols (1979) Benzo(a)pyrene uptake by human plasma lipoproteins in vitro. Cancer Res. 39:1224–1230.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Busbee, D.L., P.W. Rankin, D.M. Payne, and D.N. Jasheway (1982) Binding of benzo(a)pyrene and intracellular transport of a bound electrophilic benzo(a)pyrene metabolite by lipoproteins. Carincogenesis 3:1107–1112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Remsen, J., and R.B. Shireman (1981) Effect of low density lipoproteins on the incorporation of benzo(a)pyrene by cultured cells. Cancer Res. 41:3179–3185.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Price, P., and E.A. Gregory (1982) Relationship between in vitro growth promotion and biophysical and biochemical properties of the serum supplement. In-Vitro 18:576–584.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Goodman, D.S. (1965) Cholesterol ester metabolism. Physiol. Rev. 45:747–839.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Evans, L., S. Patton, and R.D. McCarthy (1961) Fatty acid com position of the lipid fractions from bovine serum lipoproteins. J. Dairy Sci. 44:475.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Strazullo, B.P., A.M. Scanu, M.C. Ritter, A. Postiglone, and M. Mancini (1978) Binding, internalization, and degradation of human serum low density lipoproteins by human leukocytes in vitro: Effect on sterol metabolism. In International Confer ence on Atherosclerosis, L.A. Carson, R. Paoletti, C.R. Sitori, and G. Weber, eds. Raven Press, New York, pp. 477–483.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Beek, B., and G. Obe (1979) Sister chromatid exchange in human leukocyte chromosomes: Spontaneous and induced frequencies in early and late proliferating in vitro. Human Genet. 49:51–61.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Snope, A.J., and J.M. Rary (1979) Cell cycle duration and sister chromatid exchange frequency in cultured human lymphocytes. Mutat. Res. 63:345–349.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Kellerman, G., E. Cantrell, and C.R. Shaw (1973) Variations in extent of arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase in cultured human lymphocytes. Cancer Res. 33:1654–1656.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Hart, P., W. Cooksley, G.C. Farrel, and L.W. Powell (1977) 3-methylcholanthrene inducibility of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase in cultured human lymphocytes depends upon the extent of blast transformation. Biochem. Pharmacol. 26:1831–1834.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Kouri, R.E., R.L. Inblum, R.G. Sosnowski, D.J. Slomiany, and C.E. McKinney (1979) Parameters influencing quantitation of 3-methylcholanthrene induced aryl-hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in cultured human lymphocytes. J. Env. Path, and Toxicol. 2:1079–1098.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Prasad, N., R. Prasad, J.E. Harrell, J. Thornby, and L. Fahr (1978) Relationship between mitogen response and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase in cultured human lymphocytes. Life Sci. 23:247–252.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Prasad, R., N. Prasad, J.E. Harrell, J. Thornby, J.H. Liem, P.T. Hudgins, and J. Tsuang (1979) Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducibility and lymphoblast formation in lung cancer patients. Int. J. Cancer 23:316–320.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Rudiger, H.W., F.V. Kohl, V. Mangels, P. Wichert, C.R. Bartram, W. Wohler, and W.E. Passarage (1976) Benzo(a)pyrene induced sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes. Nature (Lond.) 262:290–292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Schurer, C.C., C.R. Bartram, H.R. Glatt, F.V. Kohl, W. Mangels, F. Oesch, and H.W. Rudiger (1980) Benzo(a)pyrene-4,5 oxide discrepancy between induction of sister chromatid exchange and binding to DNA in cultured human fibroblasts. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 609:272–277.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Bayer, U., M. Younes, and C.P. Siegers (1981) Enhancement of benzo(a)pyrene-induced sister chromatid exchange as a consequence of glutathione depletion in vivo. Toxicol. Lett. 9:339–349.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Lambert, B., A. Lindblad, K.G. Holmberg, and D. Francesconi (1982) The use of sister chromatid exchange to monitor human populations for exposure to toxicologically harmful agents. In Sister Chromatid Exchange, S. Wolff, ed. John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 149–151.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Deaven, L.L., and E.W. Campbell (1980) Factors affecting the induction of chromosomal aberrations by cadmium in Chinese ham ster cells. Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 26:251–260.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. K. Wiencke
    • 1
  • K. Kelsey
    • 2
  • R. Kreiger
    • 1
  • V. F. Garry
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Environmental Pathology Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Occupational MedicineHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations