• E. Bryan Carne
Part of the Applications of Communications Theory book series (ACTH)


In common with other segments of the contemporary environment, telephony, radio, and television have benefited from the introduction of solid-state devices and digital computer techniques. In addition, in the United States, the measured pace of telecommunication evolution in a regulated market, which characterized the first three-quarters of this century, has been shattered by the adoption of a procompetition philosophy by regulators, the breakup of the world’s largest telephone company under the supervision of a federal court, and the entry of new firms into the telecommunication market that possess substantial resources earned from other endeavors. The result is a highly fluid environment in which providers seek to interest users in a plethora of advanced telecommunication services and computer-based equipment which have applications at work and at home.


Federal Communication Commission Telecommunication Service Telecommunication Industry Access Line Dominant Service 


Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.


  1. 1.
    Toffler, A., Future Shock, Random House, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Utterback, J.M., Innovation in industry and the diffusion of technology, Science 183, 620–626 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ellis, L.W., Scale economy coefficients for telecommunications, IEEE Trans. Syst. Man Cybern. SMC-10(1), 8–16 (1980).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mason, L.G., and Combot, J.-P., Optimal modernization policies for telecommunications facilities, IEEE Trans. Commun. COM-28(3), 317–324 (1980).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    United States vs. Western Electric Co., Inc. and American Telephone and Telegraph Co. 1982–2 Trade Cases (CCH)§64.900.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Bryan Carne
    • 1
  1. 1.GTE Laboratories IncorporatedWalthamUSA

Personalised recommendations