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Unexpected Tissue Distribution of Liposomes Coated with Amylopectin Derivatives and Successful Use in the Treatment of Experimental Legionnaires’ Diseases

  • Junzo Sunamoto
  • Mitsuaki Goto
  • Takaaki Iida
  • Kohei Hara
  • Atsushi Saito
  • Akimitsu Tomonaga

Abstract

Bacterial and plant cell membranes are covered by cell walls of polysaccharide derivatives. The cell walls do not only serve to maintain the shape and stiffness of cells and to protect the cell membranes against external stimuli but also play an important role in various biological recognition processes, for instance antigen-antibody interaction, toxin recognition, and cell-cell adhesion,

Keywords

Alveolar Macrophage Human Monocyte Liposomal Membrane Gyratory Shaker Unilamellar Liposome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junzo Sunamoto
    • 1
  • Mitsuaki Goto
    • 1
  • Takaaki Iida
    • 1
  • Kohei Hara
    • 2
  • Atsushi Saito
    • 2
  • Akimitsu Tomonaga
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial Chemistry Faculty of EngineeringNagasaki UniversityNagasaki 852Japan
  2. 2.The Second Department of Internal Medicine School of MedicineNagasaki UniversityNagasaki 852Japan

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