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Cell-Type-Independent Accumulation of Phosphatidic Acid Induced by Trifluoperazine in Stimulated Human Platelets, Leukocytes, and Fibroblasts

  • Marco Ruggiero
  • Gabriella Fibbi
  • Mario Del Rosso
  • Simonetta Vannucchi
  • Franca Pasquali
  • Vincenzo Chiarugi

Abstract

It is generally believed that receptor-stimulated breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI) is implicated in transmembrane cell signaling whereby activation of a variety of cell surface receptors brings about a rise in intracellular calcium (Michell, 1975; Nishizuka, 1983; Irvine et al., 1983). The breakdown of polyphosphated phosphoinositides is characterized by the rapid interconversion of short-lived intermediates (suggesting the so-called “phosphatidylinositol cycle”), where diacylglycerol (DG) is phosphorylated to phosphatidic acid (PA) by a DG-kinase, which is in turn reconverted to PI via CDP-diglyceride-inositolphosphatidyl transferase.

Keywords

Phosphatidic Acid Phorbol Ester Phosphatidic Acid Human Foreskin Fibroblast Phenyl Methyl Sulfonyl Fluoride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Ruggiero
    • 1
  • Gabriella Fibbi
    • 1
  • Mario Del Rosso
    • 1
  • Simonetta Vannucchi
    • 1
  • Franca Pasquali
    • 1
  • Vincenzo Chiarugi
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Biology Institute of General PathologyUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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