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Antitumor Adjuvants from Candida Albicans : Effects on Human Allogenic T-Cell Responses “In Vitro”

  • Clara Ausiello
  • Giulio Spagnoli
  • Francesca Mondello
  • Pierfrancesco Marconi
  • Francesco Bistoni
  • Antonio Cassone

Abstract

Candida albicans (CA) and other yeasts have recently been shown to act as strong, non-specific immunoadjuvants in combined chemoimmunotherapy in a mouse lymphoma model (1,2). Several cell wall fractions of distinct antigenicity and chemical composition have been used in “in vivo” experiments and showed a differential capacity of stimulating both anticancer effects and immunoresponsiveness (2). Other pieces of experimental evidence strongly suggest that the overall immunostimulating activity of yeast adjuvants depend on the potentiation of classical T-cell responses against products of minor histocompatibility loci or tumor-associated transplantation antigens of experimental, virus-induced tumors (2,3).

Keywords

Candida Albicans Cell Wall Fraction Mixed Lymphocyte Culture Histocompatibility Locus Mixed Lymphocyte Culture Reactivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clara Ausiello
    • 1
    • 2
  • Giulio Spagnoli
    • 1
  • Francesca Mondello
    • 2
  • Pierfrancesco Marconi
  • Francesco Bistoni
  • Antonio Cassone
    • 2
  1. 1.Ist.Tipizzazione TissutaleCNRL’AquilaItaly
  2. 2.Lab.Batteriol.Micol.MedicaISSRomaItalia

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