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Reproduction pp 373-422 | Cite as

Neurological Bases of Male Sexual Behavior

A Comparative Analysis
  • Benjamin L. Hart
  • Mitzi G. Leedy
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

The sexual behavior of most of the commonly studied mammalian species is highly stereotyped. To the uninitiated, this stereotyping would suggest the possibility of a rather close correspondence between the functioning of particular neuronal systems and the different aspects of sexual behavior, as well as a degree of uniformity across various species in the neural areas that mediate the behaviors. Some work, indeed, supports this viewpoint. However, many studies show that various aspects of male sexual behavior are controlled by diverse neural areas and that there are noteworthy differences among species.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Copulatory Behavior Preoptic Area Septal Lesion Penile Erection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin L. Hart
    • 1
  • Mitzi G. Leedy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiological Sciences, School of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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