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Reproduction pp 183-227 | Cite as

The Role of Gonadal Hormones in the Activation of Feminine Sexual Behavior

  • Lynwood G. Clemens
  • David R. Weaver
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

For early scholars, the first questions about sexual behavior were largely ones of localization: Where does the sexual impulse come from? The poet Virgil associated the copulatory activity of cattle with the presence of the gadfly and thought that the gadfly noise or bite might cause sexual activity. In 1901, W. Heape introduced the term estrus for the recurrent periods of sexual excitement in animals, which are also called heat. (The word oïstros is the Greek name for the gadfly.)

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Luteinizing Hormone Sexual Receptivity Estrous Cycle Ovarian Hormone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynwood G. Clemens
    • 1
  • David R. Weaver
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoology and Neuroscience ProgramMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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