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Reproduction pp 101-182 | Cite as

Reproductive Physiology and Behavior Interactions in Nonmammalian Vertebrates

  • David Crews
  • Rae Silver
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

Reproduction is an intricate and complex process, the investigation of which can involve the study of physiology, behavior, and individual and evolutionary history. Vertebrates exhibit a diversity of reproductive strategies in each of these aspects. Examples include internal and external fertilization; viviparous, ovoviviparous, and oviparous modes of reproduction; cystic and noncystic patterns of gametogenesis; and bisexual and unisexual reproduction, including hermaphroditism and parthenogenesis. Indeed, at least nine genera of nonmammalian vertebrates exhibit unisexual reproduction in which diploid or triploid ova either develop spontaneously or are stimulated to develop by sperm from bisexual species (gynogenetic reproduction) or by gametic fusion with the sperm of bisexual species (hybridogenesis).

Keywords

Zebra Finch Japanese Quail Courtship Behavior Reproductive Physiology Rana Pipiens 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Crews
    • 1
  • Rae Silver
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Biology and Psychology and Social Relations and The Museum of Comparative ZoologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBarnard College of Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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