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Reproduction pp 665-721 | Cite as

Steroid Hormone Receptors in Brain and Pituitary

Topography and Possible Functions
  • Victoria N. Luine
  • Bruce S. McEwen
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

That steroid hormones influence brain function and behavior has been an experimentally documented observation since the work of Berthold (1849) on the testicular control of mating and aggressive behavior in roosters. The role of gonadal steroids in the control of mating behavior is perhaps best described as a permissive action in which physical stimuli from the sexual partner actually trigger the behavior. However, the primary permissive role of gonadal steroids such as estradiol and testosterone does not appear to be that of a costimulus in that the hormone does not necessarily have to be present at the time that the behavior is elicited. This circumstance can now be better understood in the light of new information concerning a cellular mechanism of steroid hormone action that appears to be universal for all steroid target tissues, neural and nonneural. It is the purpose of this chapter to describe this cellular mechanism of steroid hormone action and to review evidence of its operation in the central nervous system and the pituitary gland in relation to the specific behavioral and neuroendocrine processes that are regulated by steroid hormones.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Estrous Cycle Preoptic Area Estradiol Benzoate Medial Preoptic Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victoria N. Luine
    • 1
  • Bruce S. McEwen
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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