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Reproduction pp 609-663 | Cite as

The Role of Metabolism in Hormonal Control of Sexual Behavior

  • Richard E. Whalen
  • Pauline Yahr
  • William G. Luttge
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

In 1970, Baulieu published a paper entitled “The Action of Hormone Metabolites: A New Concept in Endocrinology.” The new concept advanced by Baulieu was that the secretions of endocrine glands may exert their biological actions only after intracellular metabolism to active agents. Specifically, Baulieu suggested that testosterone (T) maintains growth and secretion of target tissues (e.g., the prostate) by local metabolism to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 3α, 5α-androstanediol (abbreviated Adiol; the chemical names, trivial names, and abbreviations of most of the steroids and drugs referred to in this chapter are given in Table 1).

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Mating Behavior Cyproterone Acetate Testosterone Propionate Estradiol Benzoate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. Whalen
    • 1
  • Pauline Yahr
    • 2
  • William G. Luttge
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychobiologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  3. 3.Department of Neuroscience and Center for Neurobiological SciencesUniversity of Florida, College of MedicineGainesvilleUSA

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