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Reproduction pp 537-605 | Cite as

Brain Mechanisms and Parental Behavior

  • Michael Numan
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

The present review concerns itself with a discussion of the brain mechanisms underlying parental behavior in mammals. Until recently, little research has been directed at attempting to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying such behavior. Additionally, most of the research has investigated the neural mechanisms underlying maternal behavior in the rat and the mouse, and the majority of these studies deal with the rat. It is hoped that the present review will be useful in stimulating research that will eventually result in a truly comparative understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying mammalian parental behavior.

Keywords

Olfactory Bulb Physiological Psychology Parental Behavior Maternal Behavior Septal Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Publications Relevant to the Neural Basis of Maternal Behavior that Appeared. Between August 1976 and May 1982

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Selected Readings

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  7. Mayer, A. D., and Rosenblatt, J. S. Effects of intranasal zinc sulfate on open field and maternal behavior in female rats. Physiology and Behavior, 1977, 18, 101–109.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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  19. Smotherman, W. P., Hennessy, J. W., and Levine, S. Medial preoptic area knife cuts in the lactating female rat: Effects on maternal behavior and pituitary-adrenal activity. Physiological Psychology, 1977, 5, 243–246.Google Scholar
  20. Smotherman, W. P., Bell, R. W., Hershberger, W. A., and Coover, G. D. Orientation to rat pup cues: Effects of maternal experiential history. Animal Behavior, 1978, 26, 265–273.Google Scholar
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  22. Terlecki, L. J., and Sainsbury, R. S. Effects of fimbria lesions on maternal behavior in the rat. Physiology and Behavior, 1978, 21, 89–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Numan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA

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