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Reproduction pp 495-536 | Cite as

Neuropharmacology, Neurotransmitters, and Sexual Behavior in Mammals

  • Bengt J. Meyerson
  • Carl Olof malmnäs
  • Barry J. Everitt
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 7)

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss the possible relationship between certain neurotransmitters, sexual behavior, and its controlling hormones. The knowledge in this field has accumulated through experiments that have utilized chemical substances that influence transmission processes in the central nervous system. To understand how drugs can be used to investigate different elements of sexual behavior, together with the possibilities and limitations of such an approach, we first survey some basic knowledge and concepts in neuropharmacology in general and behavioral pharmacology in particular. We follow this survey with a review of the experimental data within this area as they relate to the neuroendocrine basis of sexual behavior.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Copulatory Behavior Luteinizing Hormone Release Hormone Sexual Motivation Estradiol Benzoate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bengt J. Meyerson
    • 1
  • Carl Olof malmnäs
    • 2
  • Barry J. Everitt
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medical PharmacologyUniversity of UppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Late of the Department of Medical PharmacologyUniversity of UppsalaSweden
  3. 3.Anatomy DepartmentUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeEngland

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