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Can Low-Protein Diet Retard the Progression of Chronic Renal Failure?

  • Jonas Bergström
  • Marianne Ahlberg
  • Anders Alvestrand

Abstract

Patients with advanced renal failure who exhibit symptoms of uremia may experience symptomatic relief concomitantly with a decrease in blood urea concentration when the dietary protein intake is reduced. Treatment with low-protein diet (LPD) in chronic uremia may significantly prolong life and postpone the mandatory time for start of chronic dialysis. Marked protein restriction (15–20 g protein per day) may be required to control uremia when glomerular filtration rate is reduced to 2–10% of normal. At such low protein intakes essential amino acids (EAA) or their N-free keto analogues (KAA) have to be furnished along with the diet to fulfill nutritional requirements and to prevent depletion of body protein (Bergström et al., 1975; Walser, 1975).

Keywords

Chronic Renal Failure Essential Amino Acid Polycystic Kidney Disease Serum Phosphate Dietary Protein Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonas Bergström
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marianne Ahlberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anders Alvestrand
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Renal MedicineKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Huddinge University HospitalHuddingeSweden

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