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Prognosis of Renal Disease in Infancy

  • T. M. Barratt
  • J. Fay
  • S. P. A. Rigden

Abstract

Although it is generally agreed that renal transplantion should be available for children over 5 years of age, there is less certainty about the correct policy for younger children with end-stage renal failure, particularly those in the first year of life, in whom the results of transplantation are less good than at other ages (Hodson et al., 1978). In order to formulate the appropriate policy for this age group, however, a prerequisite is an accurate knowledge of the natural history of renal disease presenting in the first year of life. Such knowledge is also important for the pediatricians responsible for the care of these babies in the first instance, and it has been our experience that an inappropriate air of pessimism at the time of initial diagnosis has interfered with mother-child bonding and with the institution of the detailed medical care necessary in the first months of life to obtain best results. We have reviewed the 711 infants admitted to the Nephrology and Urology Departments of the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London, during 1971–1980 with this problem in mind (Barratt et al., 1982).

Keywords

Chronic Renal Failure Plasma Creatinine Chronic Renal Insufficiency Chronic Renal Disease Renal Osteodystrophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Barratt
    • 1
  • J. Fay
    • 1
  • S. P. A. Rigden
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyInstitute of Child HealthLondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsGuy’s HospitalLondonEngland

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