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Nonverbal Behavior Research and Psychotherapy

  • Martha Davis

Abstract

There have been many assertions of the importance of body movement, facial expression, voice tone, and other aspects of nonverbal behavior in face-to-face interaction. And, if one includes research from anthropology, communication, and ethology as well as psychology, there is now an extensive and fascinating literature on bodily communication that is of potential value to the clinician (M. Davis, 1972; M. Davis & Skupien, 1982).

Keywords

Facial Expression Body Movement Nonverbal Behavior Nonverbal Communication Dance Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martha Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health SciencesHahnemann UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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