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Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Psychodynamic Practice

  • Robert H. Keisner

Abstract

That people engage in self-fulfilling prophecies is not new. What is not generally known, however, is how pervasive this phenomenon is. This chapter will focus on the identification and exploration of this process in experimental, natural, and clinical settings. A synergistic relationship between research and practice, with fantasy-created realities as a conceptual bridge, will be demonstrated. It will become clear that people in all walks of life, normal and pathological, use their own fantasies and hypotheses to create social realities.

Keywords

Projective Identification Target Person Experimental Social Psychology Personal Construct Blind People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Keisner
    • 1
  1. 1.C. W. Post CenterLong Island UniversityGreenvaleUSA

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