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Definition and Overview

So great is the power of fantasy that few readers, if any, will be able to complete this chapter with their minds entirely concentrated upon the text. Rare are the stretches of time when our minds remain unwaveringly upon the task at hand in the here and now. The mind wanders. Even as we work away at a given assignment, we mentally dart ahead to tonight’s dinner, to tomorrow’s deadline, to next week’s visit to the doctor. We become aware of how our body feels in the chair, and that reminds us of how we feel with our new jogging program, of our plan to buy some new furniture, of the need to turn up the furnace. Fragmentary images, distant recollections, the jingle from an advertisement, and habitual daydreams vie for our attention.

Keywords

Mental Activity Mental Imagery Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation Visual Imagery Sexual Fantasy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth S. Pope
    • 1
  1. 1.Los AngelesUSA

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