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Estrogen-Dependent Kidney Tumors

  • Joachim G. Liehr
  • David A. Sirbasku

Abstract

Kidney tumors in laboratory animals, in particular, hormone-dependent tumors, were subjected to detailed investigations in the hope of obtaining insight concerning genesis and treatment of human kidney cancer. Shared characteristics between renal adenocarcinoma in human beings (reviewed elsewhere by Kantor, 1977, and Clark and Anderson, 1976) and in laboratory animals led to suggestions (Bloom et al., 1967; Bloom and Wallace, 1964) that a hormonal influence on renal carcinoma in human beings may exist, although such relationships were never established. Also, kidney development from the embryonic urogenital ridge suggested an influence of hormones in kidney function and neoplastic transformation.

Keywords

Renal Tumor Renal Carcinoma Syrian Hamster Kidney Tumor Syrian Golden Hamster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim G. Liehr
    • 1
  • David A. Sirbasku
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyThe University of Texas Medical School at HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyThe University of Texas Medical School at HoustonHoustonUSA

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