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The Role of Regional Centers for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

  • Donald P. Goldstein
  • Ross S. Berkowitz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 176)

Abstract

The concept of establishing regional centers for the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) evolved as a direct result of the success of the program established by Dr. Roy Hertz at the National Cancer Institute. A number of individuals trained in the field of obstetrics and gynecology emerged from the clinical fellowship program at that institution who recognized that they had both an obligation and an opportunity to create in their own academic centers the type of facility which had functioned so well on a national level for over 10 years. Decentralization, as it were, would at the same time make available this new therapeutic modality to the largest number of patients and provide an adequate source of material for expanded clinical and laboratory research and teaching programs.

Keywords

Local Resection Blastic Disease Hydatidiform Mole Single Agent Chemotherapy Gestational Trophoblastic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald P. Goldstein
    • 1
  • Ross S. Berkowitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Harvard Medical SchoolNew England Trophoblastic Disease CenterBostonUSA

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