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Stimulation of Cardiac Contractility by Catecholamines is Diminished in Experimental Uremia

  • W. Kreusser
  • M. Rambausek
  • P. Klooker
  • U. Brückner
  • E. Ritz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 178)

Abstract

Cardiovascular complications are common among uremic patients. Various factors such as hypertension, anemia, acidosis, overhydration and hyperkalemia may interfere with cardiac function and explain the high cardiovascular mortality of uremic patients. Therefore, much controversy exists as to whether these factors explain the cardiac dysfunction or whether some specific “uremic cardiomyopathy” exists (1, 2). To further clarify this issue, a model of acute uremia, in which all the above factors were absent, was chosen to study myocardial performance in uremia.

Keywords

Cardiac Contractility Left Ventricular Pressure Uremic Patient Lactate Pyruvate Chronic Uremia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Kreusser
    • 1
  • M. Rambausek
    • 1
  • P. Klooker
    • 1
  • U. Brückner
    • 1
  • E. Ritz
    • 1
  1. 1.Depts. Internal Medicine and Experimental SurgeryUniversity of HeidelbergGermany

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