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The Structure and Evolution of Neurotransmitter Receptors (α- and β-Adrenergic, Dopaminergic and Muscarinic Cholinergic)

  • J. Craig Venter
  • Claire M. Fraser
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 160)

Abstract

This laboratory has studies underway on the molecular characterization of the major receptors of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the slow inward calcium channel of cardiac and smooth muscle (1). The receptors under investigation include α1, α2, β1 and β2-adrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic and dopaminergic types. To date we have made substantial progress with the complete purification of α1, βl and β2 adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors and have molecular size information on α2-adrenergic and D2 dopaminergic receptors (Table I).

Keywords

Muscarinic Receptor Neurotransmitter Receptor Receptor Structure Limited Proteolysis Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Craig Venter
    • 1
  • Claire M. Fraser
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular ImmunologyRoswell Park Memorial InstituteBuffaloUSA

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