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Effect of Vegan and Meat Protein Diets in Mild Chronic Portal-Systemic Encephalopathy

  • B. Jeppsson
  • A. Kjällman
  • U. Åslund
  • A. Alwmark
  • P. Gullstrand
  • B. Joelsson

Abstract

Patients with liver impairment tend to develop protein intolerance, and excess protein intake may in these patients precipitate encephalopathy. The etiology of hepatic encephalopathy is closely linked to the altered protein metabolism in liver disease.1 There is some evidence to suggest that tolerance to protein diets in liver disease may vary depending on the nature of the diet. Fenton et al.2 demonstrated that patients with portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) tolerate a milk diet better than a similar amount of protein given as meat. More recently Greenberger et al.3 reported results suggesting that patients with encephalopathy tolerate vegetable protein better than meat protein. There may be several reasons for this difference such as different generation of ammonia and different amino acid profiles in various types of protein.

Keywords

Hepatic Encephalopathy Orange Juice Psychometric Test Plasma Amino Acid Vegan Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Jeppsson
    • 1
  • A. Kjällman
    • 1
  • U. Åslund
    • 1
  • A. Alwmark
    • 1
  • P. Gullstrand
    • 1
  • B. Joelsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Surgery and PsychiatryUniversity of LundLundSweden

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