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Nutritional Effects of Branched-Chain Ketoanalogues in Chronic Hepatic and Renal Failure: A Preliminary Report

  • F. Fiaccadori
  • L. Borghi
  • G. Elia
  • F. Ghinelli
  • A. Montanari
  • A. Novarini
  • G. Pedretti
  • G. Pelosi
  • D. Sacchini
  • A. Borghetti

Abstract

Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and with liver cirrhosis (LC) show a severe impairment of nitrogen metabolism1 which is characterized by a quantitative (i.e. catabolic state, negative nitrogen balance) and qualitative (i.e., modified amino acid profile) imbalance. Restriction of dietary proteins has frequently been used in the treatment of both diseases. It was recently reported that branched chain ketoanaloggues (BCKA) might also provide a useful tool in the management of CRF2 as well as LC.3 The aim of the present investigation was to establish whether a restricted diet supplemented by oral BCKA might be more efficacious than a protein restricted diet alone in the treatment of patients presenting both CRF and LC with recurrent hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The effect of the two protocols were ascertained by the assessment of nitrogen balance and intracellular muscle composition.

Keywords

Liver Cirrhosis Chronic Renal Failure Hepatic Encephalopathy Nitrogen Balance Chronic Pyelonephritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Fiaccadori
    • 1
  • L. Borghi
    • 2
  • G. Elia
    • 2
  • F. Ghinelli
    • 1
  • A. Montanari
    • 2
  • A. Novarini
    • 2
  • G. Pedretti
    • 1
  • G. Pelosi
    • 1
  • D. Sacchini
    • 1
  • A. Borghetti
    • 2
  1. 1.Cattedra di Malattie InfettiveUniversità di ParmaParmaItaly
  2. 2.Istituto di Semeiotica MedicaUniversità di ParmaParmaItaly

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